RAD STAIN 1gal MenuWhen working with newly installed wood and decking surfaces, the Restore-A-Deck wood stain is ideal after 3-6 months of natural weathering. Restore-A-Deck wood stain’s long-lasting composition works hard to absorb quickly and penetrate deep into the wood grain to withstand the elements and stay true to its beautiful finish long after the stain project is complete.

Before beginning the staining process, it is recommended that new wood surfaces be installed 3-6 months before prepping and staining. To prep new wood surfaces after the waiting period, use Restore-A-Deck Cleaner. It’s concentrated powder formula is cost-effective, easy to transport, and especially good at removing dirt, grime, mold, and mildew that is prone to showing up on new wood surfaces.

Note: Kiln dried and KDAT wood still needs to weather after install. About 1-2 months. Rough sawn cut wood does not need to weather. 

After the new wood has been cleaned, the wood will appear slightly darker. To restore the wood and neutralize the pH, use Restore-A-Deck brightener to lighten it to its original appearance. The RAD Wood Brightener further opens the wood pores for an ideal surface to apply Restore-A-Deck wood stain.

Following Restore-A-Deck Wood Brightener, continue with Restore-A-Deck wood Stain. Unlike other brands of wood stain, Restore-A-Deck’s formula can be applied to wood surfaces following the Brightener on the same day on damp wood or can be applied to dry wood on following days. If applying to damp wood, it is recommended to allow the wood to dry 2-4 hours after prep is complete.

Only 1 coat should be applied to new wood that is less than 9 months old. A light maintenance coat of stain should be applied 12-18 months after the first coat was applied. Every 2-3 years after that is normal.

If you have any questions, please comment below.

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    Hunter · 06/05/2018
    I have a pressure treated pine deck that is 16 years old. It hasn’t been stained in over 10 years. I don’t know what type of stain was on it before or if anything was applied. I pressure washed the mildew away and the wood now looks great...almost like brand new and the wood is in great shape. What do you recommend that I do next?
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    Rachel · 05/31/2018
    I have cedar deck, a year old. Do I just do the single coat, or two coats? Thank you!
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    Ellen · 05/26/2018
    With the every 2 to 3 year maintenance staining, do you need to strip the deck first or just clean it?
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      RAD Products · 05/27/2018
      You could do either. Most just clean and recoat.
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    Larry Doell · 05/14/2018
    Have had T & G pine stacked for 15 years and am now sanding it with 120 grit sandpaper before applying it to soffits. Is your product compatible with my needs ?
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      RAD Products · 05/15/2018
      You are sanding it too smooth for a stain to soak in correctly. 80 grit is the finest it should be sanded. Where is this being installed?
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    Josh · 05/14/2018
    Can an airless sprayer be used?
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    Maura · 05/08/2018
    I have an older cedar deck (Age unknown, maybe 10 years?) that we are almost done sanding down to clean wood, and replacing a handful of boards with new ones. How should I handle finishing since I have a mix of old and new wood?
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      RAD Products · 05/08/2018
      Clean and brighten the wood for the final prep before applying a stain.
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        Maura · 05/08/2018
        Great! I was concerned I needed to let the 5 or 6 new boards weather in place for several months...which wouldn't be great for the newly sanded old wood.
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    Gaylord · 05/05/2018
    Have treated pine deck with 20 yrs of Sherwin Wms stains built up that were flaking and discolored. Used RAD stripper with power washer. Only about 20-30% of finish came up -- see pic. Should I keep applying stripper coats? If stripper only gets 50-60% up, should I sand the rest? or should I just sand down to bare wood now? If I sand, should I wait 3-6 months before cleaning and applying RAD stain?
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      RAD Products · 05/05/2018
      The build of SW is excessively thick and a stain stripper will not remove all of this so sanding will be needed. Sand with 60-80 grit and then wait about a month. Clean and brighten for the final prep.
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    JOANNE KLINGBEIL · 04/06/2018
    We have let our new deck weather ~ 12 months. Should we wait 12 months after the first coat of stain to apply the second coat?
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    Jeff · 04/06/2018
    I have a new vehicular bridge with 4"x12"x13' full dimension pressure treated Douglas Fir decking. Would Restore-A-Deck be appropriate for this application? If so, how long should I let it weather before prepping and applying the Restore-A-Deck? I live in Texas and the bridge is in full sun.
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    David hughes · 03/18/2018
    Would this stain work as well right after sanding new(2 month old) redwood?
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      RAD Products · 03/18/2018
      No. If you sand, you need to weather again and prep with the Step1/Step2. Sanding is not a good way to prep as it will limit the stain's ability to properly soak in. You want the wood porous and a slightly rough profile for proper performance.
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        Mark Maloney · 04/24/2018
        If you recommend not sanding, then will the cleaner and brightener applications remove weathered gray UV coloration? I was going to sand to remove the gray coloration but is this not recommended or needed? I have a pergola made of white and red oak that has weathered for 12 months.
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          RAD Products · 04/24/2018
          Yes the prep products are designed to remove oxidation graying. Use a pressure washer as well with the cleaner.